Failed Watchtower Predictions.

The beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses revolve around the coming of armageddon, the millennium and everlasting life on a paradise earth. The Watchtower Society has made, and continues to make, predictions based on an obviously flawed understanding and interpretation of the Bible. [1] [21] [22] [23]

Some early predictions were touted as "beyond a doubt" [2] and "established truth". [3]

Still today Jehovah's Witnesses are told to adopt Watchtower teachings without question [4] [5] [6] or face excommunication (disfellowshipping) and shunning if they share their nagging doubts with believers and/or non believers. [7] [8] [24]

Of course when predictions fail, they have altered the predictions or abandoned them.

There has been occasions when the Watchtower has downplayed and dismissed what they previously said, taking the position that members had "read into the Watch Tower statements that were never intended." [9] and that members are to blame for what they previously believed. [10]

Even though the Watch Tower has rejected accusations that it is a false prophet [11][12], their track record proves that they are. [23] Their predictions have repeatedly failed. [23]

The Watchtower claims to be God's prophet [21] and at the same time says its explanations of Bible prophecy are not infallible [13] [14] [15] [16]. They say their predictions are not claimed explicitly as "the words of Jehovah." [17]

The Watchtower says that some of its teachings need adjustment from time to time but changes in doctrine are no reason to "call into question the whole body of truth." [18]

To confuse matters even more, the Watchtower says that predicting the future is 'a serious sin' and those who predict the future 'will not inherit God's Kingdom'. They say that 'to predict the future is to run the risk of incurring serious spiritual problems and ending up a slave of “the wicked spirit forces'. [22]

Former member of the Watchtower's governing body, Raymond Franz said that the organization tries to evade responsibility when defending false teachings and predictions by claiming human fallibility, but how can that be a valid excuse when the organization portrays themselves as God's channel of communication? [19]

References.

1. Crompton, Robert (1996), Counting the Days to Armageddon, Cambridge: James Clarke & Co, pp. 9, 115, ISBN 0-227-67939-3

2. In 1892 the Watch Tower asserted that God's battle, Armageddon, which was believed to be already under way, would end in October 1914, a date "definitely marked in Scripture," (15 January 1892, page 1355) and Watch Tower editor Charles Taze Russell declared: "We see no reason for changing the figures—nor could we change them if we would. They are, we believe, God's dates, not ours." (The Watchtower, 15 July 1894, page 1677). Christ's thousand-year reign was predicted to begin "probably the fall" of 1925, based on other dates upon which God had placed "the stamp of his seal ... beyond any possibility of erasure". (The Watch Tower, May 15, 1922, p. 150, as cited by Raymond Franz, Crisis of Conscience, page 224).

3. The Time is at Hand, Watch Tower Society, 1889, pages 98-99, as cited by Raymond Franz, Crisis of Conscience, page 193.

4. "Following Faithful Shepherds with Life in View", The Watchtower, October 1, 1967, page 591, "Make haste to identify the visible theocratic organization of God that represents his king, Jesus Christ. It is essential for life. Doing so, be complete in accepting its every aspect ... in submitting to Jehovah's visible theocratic organization, we must be in full and complete agreement with every feature of its apostolic procedure and requirements."

5. "The Godly Qualities of Love and Hate", The Watchtower, 15 July 1974: 441, "Christians have implicit trust in their heavenly Father; they do not question what he tells them through his written Word and organization."

6. Raymond Franz, Crisis of Conscience, 2007, page 174, "No less serious is it when a group of men have divided views on predictions related to a certain date and yet present their adherents an outward appearance of united confidence, encouraging those adherents to place unwavering trust in those predictions."

7. Botting, Heather; Gary Botting (1984), The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses, University of Toronto Press, pp. 66–69, ISBN 0-8020-6545-7

8. Franz, Raymond (2007), In Search of Christian Freedom, Atlanta: Commentary Press, pp. 18–28, ISBN 0-914675-17-6

9. Jehovah's Witnesses in the Divine Purpose, Watch Tower Society, 1959, page 52.

10. The organization claimed that the beliefs of Jehovah's witnesses were 'based on wrong premises'. "A Solid Basis for Confidence", The Watchtower, July 15, 1976, page 440.

11. "Why So Many False Alarms?", Awake!, March 22, 1993, pages 3-4, footnote.

12. Reasoning From the Scriptures, Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society, 1989, pg 137.

13. "Preaching Christ—Through Envy or Goodwill?", The Watchtower, May 15, 1976, p. 297, "Jehovah’s Witnesses as modern-day Christians are working hard to get this good news preached to every individual. They do not claim infallibility or perfection. Neither are they inspired prophets."

14. "Views From the Watchtower", Zion's Watch Tower and Herald of Christ's Presence, January 1908, "We are not prophesying; we are merely giving our surmises ... We do not even [assert] that there is no mistake in our interpretation of prophesy and our calculations of chronology. We have merely laid these before you, leaving it for each to exercise his own faith or doubt in respect to them."

15. Revelation - Its Grand Climax, Watch Tower Bible & Tract Society, 1988, page 9.

16. Watchtower quotes about having no divine inspiration. (Mistakes are possible)

17. "Why So Many False Alarms?", Awake!, March 22, 1993, pages 3-4, footnote.

18. "Allow No Place for the Devil!", The Watchtower, March 15, 1986, page 19, "Some opposers claim that Jehovah’s Witnesses are false prophets. These opponents say that dates have been set, but nothing has happened. ... Yes, Jehovah’s people have had to revise expectations from time to time. Because of our eagerness, we have hoped for the new system earlier than Jehovah’s timetable has called for it. But we display our faith in God’s Word and its sure promises by declaring its message to others. Moreover, the need to revise our understanding somewhat does not make us false prophets or change the fact that we are living in 'the last days,' ... How foolish to take the view that expectations needing some adjustment should call into question the whole body of truth! The evidence is clear that Jehovah has used and is continuing to use his one organization."

19. Raymond Franz, Crisis of Conscience, 2007, page 174, "No less serious is it when a group of men have divided views on predictions related to a certain date and yet present their adherents an outward appearance of united confidence, encouraging those adherents to place unwavering trust in those predictions."

20. What does the Bible say about how to identify the False Prophet

21. 'This “prophet” was not one man, but was a body of men and women. It was the small group of footstep followers of Jesus Christ, known at that time as International Bible Students. Today they are known as Jehovah’s Christian witnesses. ... Of course, it is easy to say that this group acts as a “prophet” of God. It is another thing to prove it. The only way that this can be done is to review the record. What does it show?', The Watchtower magazine, April 1, 1972, Article: ‘They Shall Know that a Prophet Was Among Them’, subtitle IDENTIFYING THE “PROPHET”

22. Ironically the Watchtower says that predicting the future is 'a serious sin' and those who predict the future 'will not inherit God's Kingdom'. 'To pay attention to astrologers or to others who claim to predict the future is to run the risk of incurring serious spiritual problems and ending up a slave of “the wicked spirit forces in the heavenly places.” (Ephesians 6:12) Thus, to consult such individuals is considered by God to be a serious sin; those who practice such things are detestable in his eyes and they will not inherit his Kingdom.—Revelation 22:15.' WT, Mar 1, 1987, Article: 'Your Future—A Better Way to Learn About It', Box on page 5. Also see Spiritualism

23. Watchtower Predictions 1889 to 2008

24. When members disagree with the Watchtower or leave the organization, Jehovah's Witnesses are required to shun their family and friends. The practice of shunning started in 1952. Even today, JW's are too embarrassed to talk about the hatred and shunning the Watchtower teaches. Those who leave are portrayed as evil doers, immoral, and guilty of 'gross sins'. Everyone is painted with the same brush. The truth is hidden in the secret rule book, Shepherd the Flock of God, that is only available to Elders and higher ranking JW's.

  • Watchtower Secrets, JW's have been required to shun family and friends since 1952. Millions of families and close relationships have ended.

  • The Watchtower teaches that God and the Watchtower organization comes first. Jehovah, Jesus, and former JW's are blamed for destroying relationships. See Shun Your Family, - 2013 Convention of Jehovah's Witnesses.

  • Religious Persecution. - hatred of Jehovah's Witnesses who leave the organization.

  • Theocratic Lies, 'spiritual warfare' against non believers and Jehovah's Witnesses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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