Persecution of Jehovah's Witnesses.

Freedom of Thought, Conscience, and Religion.

Jehovah's Witnesses are persecuted for their religious beliefs. The world needs to be aware of what's going on in secret and publicly that affects the lives of millions of people world wide.

Double Standards.

The Watchtower fights for freedom of thought, conscience, and religious beliefs to avoid persecution for their unpopular beliefs. [1] However at the same time, they persecute members who leave the Watchtower Society [5] because their thoughts, conscience, and religious beliefs will not allow them to continue being Jehovah's Witnesses.

The Watchtower, - Hypocritical Supporters of Basic Human Rights.

The Watchtower Society indicates they are strong supporters of the European Court of Human Rights, Article 9 relating to freedom of thought, conscience, and religious beliefs when it comes conscientious objectors. [1] [2]

However at the same time they require Jehovah's Witnesses to shun family members and loved ones who leave the faith for the very same reasons, - freedom of thought, conscience, and beliefs.

Jehovah's Witnesses who leave their religion are conscientious objectors. They object to pledging allegiance to the Watchtower organization just like Jehovah's Witnesses object to pledging allegiance to their country. Their conscience, thoughts, and beliefs will no longer allow them to support Watchtower policies, practices, and viewpoints. [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

If the Watchtower REALLY supported freedom of religion, Jehovah's Witnesses would be free to leave the Watchtower Society without being punished, controlled, and manipulated into returning to the Watchtower. [2] [3] [4] [7]

The truth is the Watchtower fights for religious freedom so they can openly spread their unpopular viewpoints and attract new members. However when a JW wants to leave and join another religion or have no religion at all, the Watchtower does NOT 'look forward to the time when all respect the dignity of fellow humans and their conscience.' [2]

References.

1. Unpopular beliefs. Jehovah's Witnesses object to military service, even if it means going to prison. The Watchtower organization and their official website, jw.org says freedom of thought, conscience, and beliefs is a basic human right upheld by Article 9 of the European Court of Human Rights Grand Chamber judgment Bayatyan v. Armenia 07.07.11

2. JW.ORG video indicating the Watchtower's support of Article 9 "Expert Views on the Right of Conscientious Objection" Towards the end of the video, the Watchtower Society's representative, Paul Gillies says, 'Jehovah's Witnesses look forward to the time when all respect the dignity of fellow humans and their conscience.'

3. At the 2013 Convention of Jehovah's Witnesses, attendees were told to shun their family if they leave the Watchtower religion and have absolutely no contact with them. As proof of this, watch the video Shun Your Family

4a. The Watchtower has required Jehovah's Witnesses to shun those who leave for 'wrong doing' since 1952. However since 1981, anyone who leaves the Watchtower for ANY reason is treated as a wrong doer!!! Thus any JW who leaves their religion is treated as an evil person and sinner who must be shunned by parents, children, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, ... all family members, friends, and loved ones for the rest of their lives (unless they repent, go through a lengthy, humiliating reinstatement process, and become active Jehovah's Witnesses again.)

4b. Here's what the Watchtower magazine, Sept 15, 1981 says about the rights of Jehovah's Witnesses who leave the organization.

14 One who has been a true Christian might renounce the way of the truth, stating that he no longer considers himself to be one of Jehovah’s Witnesses or wants to be known as one. When this rare event occurs, the person is renouncing his standing as a Christian, deliberately disassociating himself from the congregation. The apostle John wrote: “They went out from us, but they were not of our sort; for if they had been of our sort, they would have remained with us.”—1 John 2:19.


15 Or, a person might renounce his place in the Christian congregation by his actions, such as by becoming part of an organization whose objective is contrary to the Bible, and, hence, is under judgment by Jehovah God. (Compare Revelation 19:17-21; Isaiah 2:4.) So if one who was a Christian chose to join those who are disapproved of God, it would be fitting for the congregation to acknowledge by a brief announcement that he had disassociated himself and is no longer one of Jehovah’s Witnesses.


16 Persons who make themselves “not of our sort” by deliberately rejecting the faith and beliefs of Jehovah’s Witnesses should appropriately be viewed and treated as are those who have been disfellowshipped for wrongdoing.

Watchtower magazine, Sept 15, 1981, p 23, par 14-16

5. The Watchtower tells Jehovah's Witnesses they must not talk to loved ones (conscientious objectors) who leave the organization or have any association with them. See Watchtower quotes in this article, Religious Persecution

6. John Cedars youtube video explains the Watchtower Society's position on human rights and how it affects those who have relatives in the organization.

7. Watchtower shunning policy quotes explaining that it is 'God's command' for cult members not to have even the slightest interaction with loved ones who leave the Watchtower Society for any reason. Jehovah's Witnesses believe that those who leave are immoral wrong doers. However for many, their only 'sin' is that their conscience will no longer allow them to be active Jehovah's Witnesses.

8. Since 1981, it became such a grievous sin to leave the Watchtower Society cult that family members and friends must be shunned for the rest of their lives, - or face the same punishment themselves, - i.e. expulsion and shunning. The 1981 Watchtower says, 'Persons who make themselves “not of our sort” by deliberately rejecting the faith and beliefs of Jehovah’s Witnesses should appropriately be viewed and treated as are those who have been disfellowshipped for wrongdoing.' Watchtower magazine, Sept 15, 1981, p 23, par 14-16 [highlighting added]

141 Rules

141 RULES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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